The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak

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Our December book club was wonderful!  The book was great!  We didn’t really do any recipes or menu based on the book this month but everyone brought cookies to share in addition to the deliciousness of minestrone soup, butternut squash with cranberries, artichoke dip, meat and cheese antipasti, cream cheese pinwheels, cheese and crackers and, wine, of course.

 

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and we had a Wilson’s Farm Market Fruits of the Forest Pie.  (Do you think we could get them to sponsor book club?  Maybe throw in a pie each month! Haha)

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Most of us finished the book or at least watched the movie though it was agreed that, “THE MOVIE DOES NOT COUNT!” The movie was good and it was a good representation, it just left out a whole whole lot.

Almost all of us gave it a big thumbs up.  There were two almost up and one sideways.  I still don’t quite understand why they didn’t like it.  Something about it starting slowly, dragging and lacking an actual story.  I’ll let them explain because…

I loved this book.  I listened to the audiobook and just loved Allan Corduner’s rich voice. I thought it was perfect for the sarcasm and dry humor, it reminded me of Alan Rickman’s portrayal of Severus Snape. I think I need to watch all the Harry Potter movies over Christmas break.  2017 may be the year I reread all the books.

I got lost in it. I loved the story and the characters and, oh, I loved the words, the beautiful lilting words, the richness of them, the imagery, the loudness of them and the quiet.

Unfortunately, one of the girls found the audiobook too much like the Frankenstein narrator and that ruined it for her! Dangit!  She watched the movie, though, and liked that.  Her other excuse is that she just finished reading The Help so no matter what she read afterward, it was bound to be a disappointment.  I call that #nextbookdepression.  I’m currently going through that a little myself.

We loved Hans Hubermann.  We adored him because he is the kindest papa. And in a different way, we loved Rosa Hubermann for her gusto and perseverance. We all know someone like Rosa. Someone who is gruff and curses and calls her loved ones terrible names. We really liked the character, Ilsa Herman, too.

Some didn’t like that death was personified.  I think it was a wonderful way to narrate this story and spread a bleak tone to the whole period of time. Death, whether a person or not, hung over the people of Europe during WWII.  It was a constant fear, making it the one who told the whole tale from the first death to the last wrapped it all in a darkness that allowed Liesel’s hope to shine through more brilliantly.

There are many stories that personify death.  Meet Joe Black, the movie with Brad Pitt that was based on an earlier movie, Death Takes a Holiday.

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I’ve read a few books with Death as a character.  A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore is a hilarious piece of satire.  Years ago, in college I read a whole series by Piers Anthony where Death, Time, Fate and Nature were characters.  The first was On a Pale Horse where the main character accidentally kills death and has to take over his job of measuring souls for good and evil and sending them to heaven or hell.  He rides a pale horse that can take on the forms of a car, plane or boat. I don’t remember much but I remember really enjoying it.

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Here’s a list of other books on Goodreads with Death as a character

It is ironic and interesting that Death, exhausted and overworked, is “haunted” by humans.  That he can’t reconcile humanity’s capacity for evil with its capacity for good.

Marcus Zusak was born in Sydney, Australia to an Austrian father and a German mother, both of whom experienced World War II firsthand in their native countries. Zusak has said that The Book Thief was unlike anything he had written before and largely inspired by stories his parents told him as a child about wartime Munich and Vienna. He singled out two stories his mother told him, one of the bombing of Munich, and one of Jews being marched through his mother’s town on their way to the Dachau concentration camp.

His mother told of “Jewish people were being marched to Dachau, the concentration camp. At the back of the line, there was an old man, totally emaciated, who couldn’t keep up. When a teenage boy saw this, he ran inside and brought the man a piece of bread. The man fell to his knees and kissed the boy’s ankles and thanked him . . . Soon, a soldier noticed and walked over. He tore the bread from the man’s hands and whipped him for taking it. Then he chased the boy and whipped him for giving him the bread in the first place. In one moment, there was great kindness and great cruelty, and I saw it as the perfect story of how humans are.”

As Death said, “I’m always finding humans at their best and worst. I see their ugly and their beauty, and I wonder how the same thing can be both.”

Or

“So much good, so much evil. Just add water. “

I loved this book.

“I have to say that although it broke my heart, I was, and still am, glad I was there.”

My rating 5 out of 5 stars (and introducing the *new* *pink star* ratings!)

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Coming soon!  All about our annual Dirty Santa Book Exchange!

2 comments on “December Book Club: The Book Thief”

  1. Tarah, I love reading your blog. Life is too bumpy for me right now but I do still try to read when I can and I would love to stay connected! I actually read the Book Thief and liked it a lot! I especially love your pictures of Henry! Happy New Year!!

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